Updates of my patterns on Ravelry

A short message today to warn those who have purchased my patterns on Ravelry: I’m reviewing my patterns (essentially the lay out) and, in the coming days, you’ll receive an update notification in your Ravelry library for the patterns you have purchased.

Why do I review my patterns?

I started to publish patterns on Ravelry 3 years ago. Even if instructions are correct (and I take this opportunity to warmly thank my testers for their dedication and support in my work), my editorial style has evolved over time.

Some patterns will have slight updates. But the oldest patterns will be subject to a more thorough review. For example, one of my first patterns, Le bois des rêves.

Le bois des rêves, one of my first published Tunisian crochet patterns

In the beginning I only wanted to review the graph, but then, while I was at it, I thought I would change a few more things. And since I’m busy with this review, I thought I could as well review the other patterns. Let’s call it a sanity check.

Does it really matter?

The big advantage of Ravelry (well, one of the big advantages) is the access to an electronic library, a place where you can save all the patterns you like. The key word here is “electronic”. It means that you have access to the latest version of the patterns you saved in your library. Forget about errata. The Ravelry library will always give you the latest update of the patterns you saved there. Isn’t it great?

Experiment on gauge

Not long ago I joined the Tunisian crochet explorers group on Ravelry. The aim is to explore different aspect of Tunisian crochet together, no matter where we are in this world. This group counts already several discussion threads. One of which is about conversion of knitting patterns into Tunisian crochet. But I actively participate to another discussion about gauge. An experiment launched by Abbey from Australia.

Ravelry group Tunisian crochet explorers
Tunisian crochet experiment on gauge
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Discussion groups on Ravelry

Ravelry is a website about yarn crafts, and more specifically about knitting and crochet. If you don’t know Ravelry yet, I strongly encourage you to join it. It’s free and you have access to a gold mine of information in different languages about projects done by people all around the world, patterns (free or to purchase) and yarns.

Ravelry is also a place to join discussion groups. By definition, a group is a number of people gathering around something they have in common. The interest shared by the group can take endless forms. On Ravelry you’ll find groups per geographical area or per interests, other than yarn crafts specifically, on a wide variety of themes such as literature, movies, food, gardening… Today I’ll tell you about 2 groups with an interest for Tunisian crochet.

The French speaking group Crochet tunisien

Ravelry is an American site and many groups have English as a default language. For those who would like to exchange in French, see the group Crochet tunisien. It’s a French speaking group with the objective to create a space on Ravelry for those who would like to share their experience about Tunisian crochet in French and find out more about other French speakers passionate about it.

Groupe Crochet tunisien sur Ravelry
Groupe Crochet tunisien sur Ravelry

A group has discussion threads. But also shared projects. Members of a group can decide to share their latest projects with the group and I find that feature particularly interesting to discover new projects I would not come across otherwise. You want to share your Tunisian crochet projects with French speakers? Do it with this group.

It’s also in this group that I have my patterns tested in French. If you want to participate to a test on a Tunisian crochet pattern in French, here is where you’ll find mine. I also have my patterns tested in English. I’ll come back on this topic later on. If you wish to test your own Tunisian crochet patterns in French, feel free to launch your requests in this group. It is open to all. It’s not my group. It’s a French speaking group about Tunisian crochet.

The group Tunisian crochet explorers

A new group has just been created. It is called Tunisian crochet explorers. I like the word “explorers”. It implies discoveries and adventures. Which is just right for Tunisian crochet, a technique that has so much more to offer than what is usually presented in books or websites.

Ravelry group Tunisian crochet explorers
Ravelry group Tunisian crochet explorers

By default, this group has English as the main language, but it is open to other languages. Should you feel more at ease to express yourself in a language known by another member, go ahead. The aim of the group is to present Tunisian crochet in all its diversities across the world, without any cultural boundaries, and to share innovative techniques to go beyond what is known in a given country.

The founders of the group are from different countries and have different designing styles, yet they are united by their common passion for Tunisian crochet and their wish to share ressources and knowledge in a constructive spirit. Yet the group is not limited to the designs of the founders. On the contrary. The aim is to explore together all the fields that Tunisian crochet has to offer. The approach is collective and inclusive.

Counting stitches

Before you start a Tunisian crochet project, ideally you make a swatch to count how many stitches you have per the measurement indicated in the pattern. However, counting stitches is not as easy as it may seem at first glance. In the sample below, how many Tunisian simple stitches do you count?

How many Tunisian simple stitches in one row?
How many Tunisian simple stitches in one row?
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How to defeat curling in Tunisian crochet

A Tunisian crochet work will always tend to curl. And curling can be severe if the fabric is dense. It’s a pure mechanical thing with weight and tension not evenly spread over the crochet work. Curling occurs when there is more fabric on one side of the work (usually but not always the back side of work).

Curling in Tunisian crochet
Curling in Tunisian crochet

The good news is there are a few things that can be done to fight against curling. You should take several aspects of your work into consideration and, ideally, combine several techniques to minimize curling.

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Double-ended hook worked flat

Today I added a page to show the basic principles of working a sample flat with a double-ended Tunisian crochet hook.

Double-ended Tunisian crochet - work flat
Double-ended Tunisian crochet – work flat

This technique can be worked in many different ways by varying stitches used and changing colors at different places. The fabric is reversible if you work the same stitches in all rows. Or can be different on the front and back sides if you opt for different stitches from one row to the next. Possibilities are endless.

Working in a spiral with a double-ended hook

Working in a spiral with a double-ended hook
Working in a spiral with a double-ended hook

New page added to my site today. This time about working in a spiral with a double-ended Tunisian crochet hook. I added a photo tutorial and a video (in French) to show the basic steps of the technique. I used the Tunisian simple stitch to keep things easy-peasy. But you can use any other Tunisian stitch to have a different texture in your work. I used 2 different colors, but you can use 2 balls of yarn in the same color. You can even use both ends of the same yarn ball.